National Girls and Women in Sports Day: Creating an Even Playing Field for All Athletes

soccerFrom tennis to mixed martial arts, women excelled across a broad spectrum of athletic events in 2015. They graced Sports Illustrated covers and ESPN highlight reels, achieving excellence in a world still dominated by testosterone. Yet even though 44 years have passed since President Nixon signed Title IX in 1972, sexism continues to rear its ugly head in competitive athletics. Even women who reach the pinnacles of success in their fields face constant battles against subtle but pervasive gender inequality.


Female athletes still have a long way to travel on the road toward total parity with men.


As 2016 ushers in another year of nail-biting finishes, heart-wrenching losses, and championship victories, it’s time to celebrate the women who made 2015 a remarkable year in sports and reflect on the work that still remains on the road to gender equality. On February 3, the Women’s Sports Foundation will do just that by hosting the 30th annual National Girls and Women in Sports Day in Washington, D.C. The event will both celebrate the progress that female athletes have made over the last four decades and promote ways to advance women’s status in the world of sports.

It would be impossible to discuss athletic accomplishments from 2015 without recognizing the ladies of the U.S. women’s national soccer team, who, in a single game, gave the United States more fútbol glory than the men’s team has offered in more than 100 years of existence. What follows is a commentary on how the team has maintained its tradition of excellence in the face of the misogyny that remains heavily embedded in competitive sports. Continue reading

Meet Our Candidates: Greg Gadek for State Senate, LD 25

The Arizona general election will be held on November 6, 2012, and early voting is underway. After the many recent legislative challenges to reproductive health care access, both nationally and statewide, the importance of voting in November can’t be overstated. To help voters, Planned Parenthood Advocates of Arizona has endorsed candidates who have shown strong commitment to reproductive health and freedom. Along with those endorsements, we are spotlighting our endorsed candidates in a series called “Meet Our Candidates.” Make your voice heard in 2012!

Mesa’s legislative district hasn’t had a candidate like Greg Gadek in several years. In the last two election cycles, the Republican candidate in Legislative District 25 has run unopposed, even though in Mesa, Democrats and independents together outnumber Republicans — a majority that Gadek believes isn’t being represented by the far-right conservatism that’s become so entrenched in the legislature.


“The deeply personal issues of reproductive choice and whom to choose as a domestic partner or spouse should be considered fundamental freedoms and protected by Arizona law.”


Running as an alternative to what he has called “a good old boy network” and “business as usual,” Gadek has received Planned Parenthood Advocates of Arizona’s endorsement for his commitment to reproductive freedom and access to reproductive health care. He also noted in his interview with PPAA that he is the first person to run for office in Mesa who supports marriage equality.

Located in Maricopa County, the newly redistricted LD 25 comprises approximately half of Mesa, including Dana Park, The Groves, Hohokam Park, Red Mountain Ranch, Riverview, Las Sendas, and Superstition Springs. Gadek generously took time for an interview with PPAA on October 16, 2012, to talk about his candidacy.

Please tell us a little about your background.

My name is Greg Gadek and I am the Democratic candidate for state Senate in Mesa’s newly redistricted LD 25. I have been a resident of our Mesa district for over 25 years and, with my wife Jennifer, have raised our family here. I have been a registered independent for most of my life but my views have always been closely aligned with the Democratic Party.

Arizona Republicans have merged to the extreme far right and I believe that it is time to stand up and take our state back to the middle. Regardless of your party affiliation, if you are frustrated and angry with Mesa’s “politics as usual,” our campaign gives you a real choice. I hope to have the opportunity to meet you in person over the coming weeks and months. And I hope that you will join me. Continue reading

What Is Title X? Free or Sliding-Scale Family Planning Services in Arizona

The Jean Hoffman Health Center in Tucson is a Title X location.

What is Title X (Title 10)? And why should I care?

The short answer: Title X may mean that some people qualify for free or reduced-cost family planning services, which could impact their ability to meaningfully access health care. In a time of rising health care costs and precarious employment, that is no small thing.

The longer explanation: Title X is a federal family planning program that was enacted in 1970. For anyone keeping historical tabs, this means that Republican President Richard Nixon signed this piece of legislation into action. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Population Affairs, “The Title X program is designed to provide access to contraceptive services, supplies and information to all who want and need them. By law, priority is given to persons from low-income families.” While there are other federally funded health care sources for people with low incomes, Title X remains the only source dedicated specifically to family planning services.


If you can’t afford family-planning and sexual health services, Title X may help.


In Arizona, the Arizona Family Health Partnership uses Title X funds to provide services to approximately 40,000 people each year. Most of these people have incomes at or below the federal poverty line and may not otherwise have access to health care. Four Arizona Planned Parenthood health centers receive Title X funds through the Arizona Family Health Partnership to provide reduced cost sexual and reproductive health care. Continue reading

¿Qué es Título X? Servicios de planificación familiar en Arizona gratuitos o con escala deslizante

El Centro de Salud Jean Hoffman en Tucson es una ubicación Título X.

Traducción por Gabriela Zaravia.

¿Que es Título X (Título 10)? ¿Y por qué me debería importar?

La respuesta corta: Título X puede significar que algunas personas califican para servicios de planificación familiar gratuitos o de costo reducido, que podrían afectar su capacidad para acceder significativamente la salud. En tiempo de los gastos de asistencia médica crecientes y empleo precario, no es ninguna cosa pequeña.

La explicación más larga: Título X es un programa de planificación familiar federal que fue decretado en 1970. Para cualquiera que guarda etiquetas históricas, esto significa que el presidente republicano Richard Nixon firmó esta pieza de la legislación en acción. Según el Ministerio de Sanidad estadounidense y Servicios sociales la Oficina de Asuntos Demográficos, “El programa Título X es diseñado para proporcionar el acceso a servicios anticonceptivos, provisiones e información a todos que quieren y los necesitan. Según la ley, dan la prioridad a personas de familias de bajos ingresos.” Mientras hay otras fuentes de asistencia médica federalmente financiadas para la gente con bajos ingresos, el Título X permanece la única fuente dedicada expresamente a servicios de planificación familiar.


Si usted no puede pagar por servicios de salud sexual y planificación familiar, Título X puede ayudar.


En Arizona, la Asociación de Salud de la Familia de Arizona usa fondos de Título X para prestar servicios a aproximadamente 40.000 personas cada año. La mayoría de estas personas tienen ingresos en o por debajo de la línea de pobreza federal y en caso contrario no pueden tener acceso a la atención de la salud. Cuatro centros de salud de Planned Parenthood Arizona reciben fondos de Título X a través de la Asociación de Salud de la Familia de Arizona para proporcionar costo reducido a la asistencia médica sexual y reproductiva. Continue reading