PCOS: Erasing the Stigma

two womenUntil I encountered health-related issues of my very own, I had never heard of PCOS. There are no PSAs, no health class curricula, and it is not uncommon for many physicians to be unfamiliar with the seemingly unrelated symptoms that can be a detriment to the life of a woman who is affected.

Irregular menstrual cycles, weight gain, sluggishness, thinning hair, depression, acne, infertility, and sometimes (but not always) cysts on the ovaries are what a woman with PCOS may have to battle on a daily basis. Not only must a woman endure the physical effects of this disorder, but also the psychological effects that come with these changes. To be clear, that is by no means a comprehensive list of symptoms.

This is polycystic ovarian syndrome, and it affects more than 5 million women in the United States alone. Continue reading

Home Pregnancy Testing 101

pregnancy testYou missed a period. You had unprotected sex. You didn’t take your birth control pills. Are you pregnant? How soon can you know? What are your options to find out?

Approximately every month, most sexually active women of child-bearing years could become pregnant. During ovulation, an egg is released from the ovary and makes its way to the uterus. If it is fertilized by a sperm and implants on the uterine wall, a woman is pregnant. If she is not pregnant, the lining of the uterus sheds (this is your period), and the cycle repeats.


Pregnancy tests are most accurate about one week after a missed period.


When a fertilized egg attaches itself to the uterine wall, the body begins producing a hormone called human chorionic gonadotropin, or hCG. The levels of this hormone rise rapidly in early pregnancy, almost doubling every two to three days. hCG is detectable in urine and blood, and is a sign of pregnancy.

There are different types of pregnancy tests available. Home pregnancy tests, which you can buy in drugstores, test for hCG in urine. Blood tests done in a health provider’s office don’t just test for the presence of hCG, which indicates you are pregnant, but also can tell how much hCG is present. Measuring hCG levels helps a provider determine how far along you are, if you have more than one developing embryo, or if there might be a problem with the pregnancy. Continue reading

Over 90 Percent of What Planned Parenthood Does, Part 10: Diabetes Screening

from http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/about/dateline/win11/5.aspxWelcome to the latest installment of “Over 90 Percent of What Planned Parenthood Does,” a series on Planned Parenthood Advocates of Arizona’s blog that highlights Planned Parenthood’s diverse array of services — the ones Jon Kyl doesn’t know about.

November is National Diabetes Month. Diabetes is a serious chronic disease — and at Planned Parenthood Arizona, we can screen you for diabetes and help you get necessary treatment if you are diagnosed with it. The American Diabetes Association recommends screening for anyone more than 45 years of age, as well as younger people who have risk factors.


At Planned Parenthood, we can screen you for diabetes; at home, you can take steps to prevent it.


What Is Diabetes?

The human body creates glucose (a type of sugar) from our food, which it breaks down into tiny molecules. Insulin, a hormone that is created in the pancreas, enters the bloodstream and enables glucose to enter our body’s cells — which use glucose as fuel. Diabetes occurs when blood glucose becomes too high and the body is unable to regulate it; this lack of regulation results in damaged tissues, leading to long-term health concerns.

There are two types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes, which is characterized by the pancreas’ inability to produce enough insulin; and Type 2 diabetes, in which the pancreas can continue to produce insulin, but the body’s cells aren’t able to utilize it. Those with Type 1 diabetes commonly encounter issues with frequent urination, increased thirst and hunger, weight loss, extreme fatigue, and blurred vision. Individuals with Type 2 diabetes may experience any of those symptoms, as well as slow-healing cuts and bruises, frequent infections, and areas of darkened skin. Heart disease is also a serious concern; an individual with diabetes has more than twice the chance of a heart attack. While some people with Type 2 diabetes experience no apparent symptoms, it can result in death if the disorder is not monitored and controlled effectively. Continue reading